Western Colorado Insects

Native Insects

Arachnida-Spiders and Scorpions
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Banded Argiope
Argiope trifasciata Forsskal

Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) Banded ArgiopePhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw
Cat-faced Spider
(Western Plains Orb-weaver)
Araneus gemmoides Chamberlin and Ivie
Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) Cat-faced spiderPhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw
Daddylonglegs
(Harvestmen, Opilionids)
Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) DaddylonglegsPhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw
Funnel Weaver Spider
(Funnel-web weavers, Grass spiders)
Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) Funnel Weaver SpiderPhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw
Jumping Spiders Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) Jumping spiderPhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw
Pseudoscorpions Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) PseudoscorpionPhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw

Roly-poly Killer
Woodlouse Hunter

Dysdera crocata Drury

Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) Roly poly killerPhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw
Scorpions Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) Scorpion
Taranchulas
Aphonopelma spp.
Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) TaranchulaPhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw

Wolf Spider

Wolf spiders are in the family Lycosidae. They are sometimes mistaken for Nursery Web spiders. These spiders are good hunters often chasing their pray over a short distance. The female lays an egg sac then attaches it to the underside of her abdomen to protect it. Once the eggs hatch the new spiderlings are carried around on the females back. Check out our Links page for more info. on spiders.

  Wolf Spider
Yellow-legged Sac Spider
Cheiracanthium inclusum (Hentz), C. mildei C.L. Koch
Colorado Insects of Interest Fact Sheet (pdf) Yellow-legged Sac SpiderPhotograph courtesy of Whitney Cranshaw

This page was updated on April 26, 2014